Into the Woods

PTH Art

Another beautiful Fall day in Central Oregon.  Isabella and I headed out to do a little exploring, nothing dangerous or even very adventurous, but I though we’d try some new trails.  After all the years I’ve lived in Bend, I have not spent much time roaming around Phil’s Trail Head, so I don’t really know the lay of the land.  In fact, a few years ago, I did get quite lost, twice in one year.

Here’s my excuse, for getting lost that is.  We left one bright sunny morning from the parking lot and headed west on Kent’s trail. After walking several miles I noticed was getting a little tired and decided to head back to the car.  Not wanting to see the same scenery twice in one day, I headed south, I thought,  with good intentions of catching Phil’s trail which was, logically, “right over there.”  Ha!  Not only was it not “right over there,” but the clouds rolled in and, directionally speaking, and I was sunk.  Galumphing over pine needles, cones and various other beautiful objects that make up the forest floor, I wasn’t even able to decide what was up hill (Skinner’s or maybe Eugene) or down hill (Bend or maybe LaPine).

Somewhere in a science or physiology class I had learned that humans have a small deposit of lead or another metal material that sits just above the bridge of the nose in the lower part of the forehead.  It was believed that that piece of metal worked as a internal compass assisting us in the general navigation of life.   Well, guess what?  I didn’t get one of those.  Knowing there had to be a trail somewhere fairly close, I carried on. At least an hour later, alas the hallucinations began.  Just ahead, I came upon signs of life.  There it was, the Galveston/14th street turn circle with the  Big Red Chicken sitting right in front of me.  Something wasn’t right though.  Things were all distorted.  The chicken before me had shrunk.  Must be Galveston’s baby, the Little Red Chicken.  At closer range it was still a Little Red Chicken.  I touched it.  “What are you doing out here, Little Chicken,” I ask it?  Are you real?

About then a bicyclist came around yon corner.  Thank God.  He was real and a normal man size. He stopped, as did the others behind him.  Pulling myself together mustering the most sane voice I could come up with I ask if “they” knew where the parking lot was.  Pointing down the trail, the same direction their bikes were headed, one guy said, “That way.”  “I knew that,” I smiled.  “Um, how far?”  About an hour on foot. They must have checked out my leg length, or lack there, of when they came up with my ETA.

That was one long day. Oh, did I mention the part where I’d left my water in the car?  How smart is that?  Several months later, when I was smarter, I repeated the same scenario.  I’ll spare myself the details.  I hadn’t really thought of those “lost years” until yesterday, in full sun, including shadows and all the directional cues necessary to activate my internal compass, after walking longer than I thought my return trip to the car would take, and on a well used trail, a sinking feeling re-emerged.  Really? No, I am not lost.  Just keep going.   I did. That was good advise, as soon I came to a surprise, to me, art installation pictured below.  I know a biscillion Bend-its and tourist have passed this place a biscillion times…and know it’s less than a mile to the  PTH parking lot.  Please don’t make fun of me.  OK?  So I’m old-er.  I do this kind of stuff.

As for art, I’m proud of the place I live in and the many opportunities that are available to display art throughout our town…and forests.  The “Little Red Chicken” was a fantastic surprise, right out there in the woods all by its little red self.  And the tinkling of the cog wheels moving in the breeze, well, I found that installation a simple and telling display of the hearts of the folks who maintain Phil’s trials and the bike clubs who are a strong presence…ie, the Skyliner’s Road update.  May “ART” prevail.  Some say it will save the world.

More art at PTH
Chimes in the woods at PTH
Isabella, Come on.  We’re not lost

Snow Park Message

While I learn to navigate a new blog theme I wanted to tell you: There was snow at the snow park last evening, but today the rain washed it all away and look what I found.

Found Message
Found Message

 

Drive to Sisters

On the 18th of September I drove from Bend to Sisters.  I was awed by the mountains.  I see them almost everyday, but there was something magic about them on that day.  There had been an early snowfall that dusted the land above about 4500 feet.  I don’t know what it was, maybe  the combination of the light, the snow, a few puffy clouds that made it seem like something magic was in the air.

Yesterday I spent most all day in my studio.  In the afternoon I was inspired to play with the North and Middle Sister.  There are a hundred things I would change in this painting, but not till next time

 

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Meditation and Art

In my original post I spoke of Transient Hypo Frontality, which refers to  the brain’s activity during Creativity.  An old myth has us believing we are left or right brained.  No!  Brain wave action does not shift, predominantly, between the right and the left hemispheres.  We need our whole brains at all times…even when being creative.

 During creativity the frontal lobe (the executive, learning, attentive front part of the brain) “down shifts” and allows other parts of the brain to meander at a slower pace about the lower regions of the brain moving us to that timeless, creative, world that produces a sensation much like daydreaming.  This is the state some pursue while meditating.

In doing this painting, one petal at a time, I shifted quietly between attentive and dreamy states of being.   One significant moment I will not forget, it seemed I entered the nature of the flower and realized the full depth of creation itself.  Art is the teacher.

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